Campylobacter Research

The Poultry Site 

Eliminating the most common cause of food poisoning from the food chain is the aim of new research funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC) and the world-leading UK-based poultry breeding company Aviagen.

 Campylobacter is responsible for more than 300,000 cases of food poisoning a year in    England and Wales and is estimated to cost the UK economy up to £600M a year. It is usually passed to humans via poultry meat which has not been cooked or handled properly. While good hygiene and thorough cooking kills the bug, preventing it entering the food chain in the first instance woul dramatically reduce the risk of infection. To this end, BBSRC and Aviagen have awarded Scottish researchers £1.3M to map genes responsible for resistance to the bug with the view to being able to breed Campylobacter-resistant chickens in the future.

About these ads

3 responses to “Campylobacter Research

  1. I was recommended this blog by my cousin. I’m not sure whether this post is written by him as no one else know such detailed about my problem. You’re wonderful! Thanks!

  2. Terrific work! This is the type of information that should be shared around the net. Shame on Google for not positioning this post higher! Come on over and visit my web site . Thanks =)

  3. Hello: thank you for getting the time of producing up this data. I continually try to further my idea of stuff. No matter if I consent or disagree, I like facts. I keep in mind the old days when the only source of info was the library or the newspaper. They both equally feel so old. : )

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s